You are here: Home

Search results

12 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type



















New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Removal of Illegally Introduced and Missed Rainbow Trout from Lynn Camp Prong, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Tennessee
This project will remove the illegally introduced and missed rainbow trout from the Lynn Camp Prong Watershed in Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Once complete, the project will reconnect brook trout populations in three tributary streams thus eliminating fragmentation in this watershed. This reconnection of stream segments will result in the largest contiguous brook trout population in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Restoration Lynn Camp Prong, Great Smokey Mountain National Park, Tennessee
The purpose of the project is to continue to restore the Southern Appalachian brook trout to a larger lower elevation stream within its historic range in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. To date, park biologists have restored 17.2 miles of historic range for brook trout. The successful completion of this project will add 8 miles to this total.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Restoration on the Chattahoochee National Forest, Tennessee
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Lynn Camp Prong, Tennessee
One of the top stressors to thriving brook trout populations is their inability to successfully compete for food and space with other, non-native (exotic) trout species such as brown and rainbow trout and warm water species such as small mouth bass. Balancing the needs of multiple fish user groups presents a unique set of challenges in developing strategies to address declines in brook trout populations due to competition from these species. Steve Moore, Fishery Biologist for the National Park Service is leading a partnership to eliminate non-native trout species from Lynn Camp Prong in the Great Smoky Mountains State Park. This effort focuses on the use of chemical means to eliminate rainbow trout from the stream. A natural barrier at the lower end of Lynn Camp Prong will exclude rainbow trout from stream. Approximately 8 miles of stream will be restored allowing brook trout to re-inhabit the stream without the challenge of competing trout species.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Project Nashville crayfish Habitat Restoration on the Nashville Zoo Property
Mill Creek Watershed has been negatively affected by urbanization,resulting in increased sedimentation,reduced habitat quality, ultimately resulting in the Nashville crayfish being federally listed. This project will restore an unnamed tributary of Mill Creek by removing a barrier and restoring connectivity of the tributary.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Harpeth River Restoration
As part of a jointly funded project via the National Fish Passage Program, the totality of this project is removing a lowhead dam and restoring the immediate area to riffle/run habitat for the benefit of improved water quality and native fish habitat in the Harpeth River, TN.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document Habitat restoration for Southern Appalachian brook trout in 5 Cherokee National Forest, TN streams
Drought and stressed habitat conditions exacerbated natural competition for food and space between brook trout and rainbow trout in several creeks in the Cherokee National Forest. Both species, popular with anglers, were declining due to drought in recent years. By improving or restoring habitats, and removing rainbow trout from certain areas, both species can more easily thrive in the forest. (Photo: Cherokee National Forest Project Sites, TN)
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document Reintroduction of Native Brook Trout into Indian Flats Prong, Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Brook trout, the only salmonid native to the southeast, have lost about 75% of their historic range due to past logging activities and introduction of non-native trout. In 1993, the National Park Service identified 10 streams that can support native southern Appalachian brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The long term goal is to restore historic range of habitat for this native species.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Watershed-Based Approach to Channel Stabilization and Sediment Control in Pleasant Run Creek
Excessive sediment from channelized tributaries of the Hatchie River (TN) are degrading downstream aquatic habitat. Pleasant Run Creek is a channelized tributary to the Hatchie River, exhibiting significant soil erosion and channel incision problems. This project seeks to implement channel stabilization measures on private lands that will improve riparian habitat on Pleasant Run Creek and reduce sediment loading to the Hatchie River.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Restoration of Critical Habitat for LIsted Mussels and Fish, Big South Fork NRRA, TN/KY
The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area is a focus for major conservation efforts due to the outstanding aquatic features found in the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River. The park is also a favorite location for equestrian riders, cyclists, and hikers. Managing a park for such multiple uses, while conserving biodiversity, is wrought with challenges.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B