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Wood Additions into the Sheepscot, Narraguagus, Machias Watersheds, Maine
In 2007, Project SHARE and the Department of Marine Resources Bureau of Sea-Run Fisheries and Habitat and private land owners undertook a "chop and drop" large wood addition project. Wood was added to streams with the intent to increase habitat complexity and salmonid survival. This project expands the large wood treatment locations to include the Sheepscot drainage, along with treatment locations on the Machias, East Machias and Narraguagus River drainages. It adds nine additional large wood treatment sites enhancing approximately 4 miles of stream for brook trout.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions, Maine
This project will assess if clam shell additions will increase in-stream pH and decrease organic aluminum concentrations in headwater brook trout streams in Maine. Two tributaries included in this study currently do not sustain fish, even though they contain high quality habitat for fish. The likely reason for fish absence is thought to be low pH and subsequently high aluminum. The clam shell industry in Maine currently pays for discarding shells shucked at processing facilities. If this project is successful, it would allow us to use a waste product to help remediate low pH and subsequent high labial aluminum issues in brook trout streams.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Chop and Drop in Sunday River, Maine
The objectives of this project are to restore riverine and riparian habitats as well as to improve ecological stream processes for native brook trout in the Sunday River drainage. Stream habitats in this drainage have been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commerical and recreational development. A half mile long treatment of each of two tributaries will receive woody debris. These tributaries and a nearby control will be monitored for geomorphic, chemical, biological, and flow responses.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Relocation of an Unnamed Sea-Run Brook Trout Stream, Maine
This project seeks to reconnect the freshwater-estuarine interface on a historic sea-run brook trout stream. At some point in the past, the stream channel was diverted from its natural channel to its present location. The presence of a low-head dam and two marginally passable culverts have blocked connectivity to the marine environment for several decades. A partially degraded stream channel will be relocated back to its original position and rehabilitated to its historic function to allow brook trout to access both freshwater and marine environments. Once complete, the project will provide access to approximately 1 mile of stream habitat and an undetermined amount of marine habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Chop and Drop in the Sunday River, Maine
Brook trout habitat in the Sunday River drainage has been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commercial and recreational development. Much of the river and its tributaries are unstable, over-widened, and lacking in deep pools, thereby reducing nursery and adult brook trout habitat. Although degradation is being addressed through a comprehensive watershed survey and main-stem restoration effort, the causal problem of accelerated runoff has not been addressed. This proposal will assess the efficacy of adding woody debris to reduce peak flows, create pools, and trap organics to enrich depauperate headwater streams.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects