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Big Run Restoration, West Virginia
The Big Run project is part of Trout Unlimited’s Home Rivers Initiative Potomac Headwaters Restoration Project. The stream has suffered habitat degradation in the riparian zone, stream banks and instream due to long-term livestock grazing. There currently exists a lifetime grazing allotment on that portion of the Monongahela National Forest that supports Big Run. The Forest Service, Trout Unlimited and others have teamed up to work with the allotment holder to fence the riparian zone, create crossings and alternative water sources to completely remove the cattle from the stream. Over time, riparian reforestation will stabilize banks and provide vital shade during warm summer months. This is the initial project on Big Run. Resources have already been secured to move down stream on the Forest and on to private property. The project will include informational and educational kiosks and trails that will improve access for anglers and hikers. The project will restore 45 acres of riparian forest and enhance 1.5 miles of stream habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Cooper Creek, Georgia
This project will restore over 1.6 miles of Southern Appalachian brook trout habitat contained within the Cooper Creek Watershed of the Chattahoochee National Forest in Georgia. Habitat within Bryant Creek and Tretty and Burnett Branches will be restored using only hand labor to minimize soil disturbance. After non-native trout species are removed, trees will be cut into and across the various stream reaches to provide in-stream cover and create pool habitat for brook trout.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Lake Champlain, Vermont
Sedimentation, increased water temperature, barriers to passage and lack of riparian vegetation have been identified as the major threats to Vermont's brook trout population. The project includes has two principle efforts underway: installation of livestock fencing, alternative water systems, and planting native trees and shrubs to restore degraded riparian areas and the replacement of an existing failed culvert with a bridge to allow for the year round upstream movement of brook trout on Stevensville Brook.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
West Virginia Brook Trout Distribution Assessment
The EBTJV range wide assessment of brook trout identified a distinct gap in our knowledge of the status and distribution of brook trout in West Virginia. This project will compile existing data on brook trout in southeastern West Virginia, conduct field surveys to fill in gaps, and collect samples for micro-satellite DNA analysis. The results will be used to produce a quality assured GIS based data set for the entire state of West Virginia that includes spatially explicit information on brook trout reproduction, population status, habitat and water quality.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
File Troff document Application Upper White River Habitat Restoration, Vermont
Application Upper White River Habitat Restoration, Vermont
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Project Lake Mary Weir Repair
This project repaired a Weir in Lake Mary within the state of Mississippi increasing water levels to benefit sport fish. (Photo: Lake Mary Weir before Construction)
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project chemical/x-pdb Green River Enhancement within the Green River WMA, KY
The Green River and Green River Lake and provide aquatic habitat in the Green River Wildlife Management Area. The river is in declining condition due to severe erosion over almost four decades. Its restoration can allow it to support thriving populations of white bass, smallmouth bass, rock bass, flathead catfish, walleye, and muskellunge, and provide sport challenges to anglers.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Channel, Bank, & Riparian Restoration to Improve Habitat and Water Quality in Kings River, AR
The natural course and riparian corridor of the Kings River have been significantly modified by various landowners over several decades, leading to channel instability and decreased habitat and water quality. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) purchased a preserve on the Kings River that includes nine miles of river. To protect and restore river and riparian habitat, TNC has created a stream channel and floodplain restoration project along 0.5 miles of the river.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document Copper Creek In-Stream Habitat Restoration Project
This project improved riparian zones, water quality, appropriate sediment flows and restoring physical habitat for multiple listed aquatic species in the Copper Creek watershed, within the Upper Tennessee River Basin. (Photo: The low water bridge that was removed and replaced with a new bridge that spans the river.)
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B