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Project Altamaha River Flathead Project: More than One Way to Skin a Cat: Controlling the spread of invasive flathead catfish through research, outreach and education
The Altamaha River Watershed Conservation Action Plan cites invasive species as one of the six highest ranked threats. One of the invasive species thriving in portions of the watershed is the flathead catfish, which cause environmental harm, threaten native species, and can change the recreational value of an area for anglers. User groups (general public, children, anglers, commercial fishermen) as well as watershed managers must work together to control a population by size or area of infestation.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Community-Based and Larger-Scale Oyster Restoration in ACE Basin NERR, South Carolina
This project will build intertidal shorelines with oyster reefs.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Community-based and larger-scale oyster restoration in ACE Basin NERR Phase II
This project will create and protect intertidal oyster reefs and saltmarsh, essential fish habitat, within the Ashepoo-Combahee-Edisto (ACE) Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve in South Carolina. Organization: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project PS document Creating Oyster Niche Structures through Restoration Using Crab Traps
Abandoned crab traps are a prevalent form of marine debris on South Carolina and other states’ scenic coastal shorelines, detracting from their natural beauty and posing an ecological threat. This project, lead by a team of researchers with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), led by Associate Marine Scientist, Dr. Peter Kingsley-Smith, is a progressive way to use abandoned and unwanted crab traps to create new and thriving oyster reef habitat with funding from the SARP/NOAA Community-based Restoration Program (CRP), SCDNR.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document Deadman's Island Restoration Project
Lead by the City of Gulf Breeze, this project restored coastal barrier habitat on Deadman's Island.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document FISH Preserve Habitat Restoration Project
The Florida Institute For Saltwater Heritage (FISH) is restoring the “kitchen”, an important fisheries habitat for the section of shallow Sarasota Bay bottom south of Cortez. For villagers during the Depression, the kitchen provided food for the tables of their struggling families and was critical to their survival. In 1999, FISH raised money through community festivals to purchase 100 acres of environmentally-sensitive waterfront property that was slated for large scale development immediately east of the village. This historically-significant area became known as the FISH Preserve and is one of the last remaining undeveloped parcels on northern Sarasota Bay.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document GTMNERR Community Oyster Shell Recycling and Living Reef Construction Project
This project established an oyster shell recycling program for St. Johns County, Florida, constructed a living shoreline, and planted spartina grass within the boundaries of the new reef to further protect the shoreline and provide nursery habitat for marine species at the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Octet Stream Hydrologic restoration of coastal wetlands on North Carolina’s Albemarle- Pamlico Peninsula
This project, lead by the Nature Conservancy's North Carolina Chapter, will restore hydrology and reverse saltwater intrusion into wetlands by replacing an inadequate water control structure and plug canals in the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Improved Recreational Fishing Through Community-based Oyster Reef Habitat Restoration, North Shore Eagle Point Oyster Restoration - Phase I and II
Oyster beds serve unique roles in estuaries, yet they are highly susceptible to over-harvesting, diseases and pollution. In addition to having both recreational and commercial value, oyster beds provide ecological benefits such as filtration and habitat for numerous species of invertebrates, fish, and plants.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project chemical/x-pdb Improving Management of Seagrass Resources through Restoration and Assessment
Lead by the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough City, this project will manage seagrass beds through creating a poll n troll zone to reduce seabed scaring, as well as testing different grass restore methods.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B