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Restoration of Natural Hydrology and Habitat Complexity in the Machias, Rivers, Maine
This project will remove 11 remnant log drive dams and add large woody debris to restore fish passage, stream connectivity and natural stream processes that will passively restore cold water habitat in the tributaries of the Machias River. A total of 27.2 miles of stream upstream of the dam sites will be affected by the project.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Restoring Connectivity in the Sunday River and Martin Stream Watersheds, Maine
Subwatersheds of the Androscoggin River contain some of the finest intact and healthy brook trout habitat in the state of Maine. This project will remove two fish passage barriers providing a total of six miles of connectivity in the Sunday River and Martin Stream subwatersheds.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Restoring Habitat Connectivity in Machias and Saint Croix River Tributary Streams, Maine
This project will restore habitat connectivity on three brook trout habitat streams and eliminate ongoing risks of sedimentation during culvert failure, in watersheds identified as brook trout habitat priorities. Removal of four fish passage barriers will reopen 3 miles of passage for brook trout.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Restoring Stream Connectivity in the WB Machias River in Maine
Project SHARE and the Service completed a basin wide stream-road crossing and fisheries assessment in the WB Machias River. There are 43 fish bearing road crossings in this subbasin that limit aquatic connectivity. To date, 11 crossing have been replaced and 8 crossings have been decommissioned. Funding has been secured to remove all but two of the remaining barriers. This project will remove one of those last two barriers in the basin, reconnecting approximately 0.5 miles of habitat for brook trout and restore ecological stream function.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Wood Additions into the Sheepscot, Narraguagus, Machias Watersheds, Maine
In 2007, Project SHARE and the Department of Marine Resources Bureau of Sea-Run Fisheries and Habitat and private land owners undertook a "chop and drop" large wood addition project. Wood was added to streams with the intent to increase habitat complexity and salmonid survival. This project expands the large wood treatment locations to include the Sheepscot drainage, along with treatment locations on the Machias, East Machias and Narraguagus River drainages. It adds nine additional large wood treatment sites enhancing approximately 4 miles of stream for brook trout.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects