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Removal of Illegally Introduced and Missed Rainbow Trout from Lynn Camp Prong, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Tennessee
This project will remove the illegally introduced and missed rainbow trout from the Lynn Camp Prong Watershed in Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Once complete, the project will reconnect brook trout populations in three tributary streams thus eliminating fragmentation in this watershed. This reconnection of stream segments will result in the largest contiguous brook trout population in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Restoration Lynn Camp Prong, Great Smokey Mountain National Park, Tennessee
The purpose of the project is to continue to restore the Southern Appalachian brook trout to a larger lower elevation stream within its historic range in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. To date, park biologists have restored 17.2 miles of historic range for brook trout. The successful completion of this project will add 8 miles to this total.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Lynn Camp Prong, Tennessee
One of the top stressors to thriving brook trout populations is their inability to successfully compete for food and space with other, non-native (exotic) trout species such as brown and rainbow trout and warm water species such as small mouth bass. Balancing the needs of multiple fish user groups presents a unique set of challenges in developing strategies to address declines in brook trout populations due to competition from these species. Steve Moore, Fishery Biologist for the National Park Service is leading a partnership to eliminate non-native trout species from Lynn Camp Prong in the Great Smoky Mountains State Park. This effort focuses on the use of chemical means to eliminate rainbow trout from the stream. A natural barrier at the lower end of Lynn Camp Prong will exclude rainbow trout from stream. Approximately 8 miles of stream will be restored allowing brook trout to re-inhabit the stream without the challenge of competing trout species.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects