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Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions, Maine
This project will assess if clam shell additions will increase in-stream pH and decrease organic aluminum concentrations in headwater brook trout streams in Maine. Two tributaries included in this study currently do not sustain fish, even though they contain high quality habitat for fish. The likely reason for fish absence is thought to be low pH and subsequently high aluminum. The clam shell industry in Maine currently pays for discarding shells shucked at processing facilities. If this project is successful, it would allow us to use a waste product to help remediate low pH and subsequent high labial aluminum issues in brook trout streams.
Located in Projects / 2009 Projects
Sevier Road Crossing Stream Restoration in the Nine Mile Creek Watershed, New York
This project will restore fish passage across the Sevier Road crossing and reconnect over 1.5 miles of brook trout habitat in an unnamed tributary to Nine Mile Creek. Project objectives are to restore channel stability and habitat function to 250 linear feet of stream using natural channel design and evaluate brook trout population response to stream channel and fish passage restoration.
Located in Projects / 2009 Projects
Brook Trout Restoration Lynn Camp Prong, Great Smokey Mountain National Park, Tennessee
The purpose of the project is to continue to restore the Southern Appalachian brook trout to a larger lower elevation stream within its historic range in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. To date, park biologists have restored 17.2 miles of historic range for brook trout. The successful completion of this project will add 8 miles to this total.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Chop and Drop in Sunday River, Maine
The objectives of this project are to restore riverine and riparian habitats as well as to improve ecological stream processes for native brook trout in the Sunday River drainage. Stream habitats in this drainage have been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commerical and recreational development. A half mile long treatment of each of two tributaries will receive woody debris. These tributaries and a nearby control will be monitored for geomorphic, chemical, biological, and flow responses.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Restoration of North Branch of the Hoosic River, Removal of the Briggsville, Massachusetts
This project will remove the Briggsville Dam in Clarksburg, Massachusetts to restore and reconnect approximately 30 miles of habitat in the North Branch Hoosic River. Removal of the dam will eliminate a barrier to the movement of aquatic and riparian species, re-establish the river's natural flow regime, improve water quality, improve the temperature regime for coldwater species, and restore natural clean gravel and cobble necessary for brook trout.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Whitethorn Creek Restoration, West Virginia
Whitethorn Creek, the most significant tributary in the Thorn Creek drainage of the South Branch of the Potomac, is historically recognized as supporting one of the best brook trout populations in West Virginia. This population has been significantly reduced in recent years as a result of land use impacts and two devastating flood events. The purpose of this project is to remove threats from agricultural impacts and in-stream habitat loss caused by the flood related activities by restoring approximately 1.5 miles of stream habitat and reestablishing 24 acres of riparian vegetation.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Relocation of an Unnamed Sea-Run Brook Trout Stream, Maine
This project seeks to reconnect the freshwater-estuarine interface on a historic sea-run brook trout stream. At some point in the past, the stream channel was diverted from its natural channel to its present location. The presence of a low-head dam and two marginally passable culverts have blocked connectivity to the marine environment for several decades. A partially degraded stream channel will be relocated back to its original position and rehabilitated to its historic function to allow brook trout to access both freshwater and marine environments. Once complete, the project will provide access to approximately 1 mile of stream habitat and an undetermined amount of marine habitat.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Habitat Enhancement Project for Brook Trout in the Asaph Run Watershed, Pennsylvania
The Asaph Run watershed has a high recreational use potential and is a popular stream with wild trout anglers. The project is located entirely on state forest land, open to free, year-round public use. The watershed has excellent public access via a state forest road that parallels much of the stream. However, the close proximity of the road to the stream has also resulted in problems including stream bank erosion and habitat degradation. Degraded brook trout habitat will be rehabilitated throughout a 3 mile stream reach. The project will be a significant long-term benefit to the watershed through enhancement of adult brook trout habitat and stabilization of the stream banks.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Brook Trout Restoration on the Chattahoochee National Forest, Tennessee
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Brook Trout Habitat Improvements to McIntosh Brook, Allegany State Park, New York
Allegheny State Park contains the most intact and widespread distribution of wild brook trout streams in western New York. Brook trout growth and abundance in McIntosh Creek are limited by a lack of large woody debris and deep water pools during summer low flow conditions. This project will add large woody debris to enhance habitat structure and deep water pools to increase wild brook trout growth and abundance, and improve the recreational fishery. Pre- and post-enhancement monitoring will be conducted and used to demonstrate this simple and low cost approach to improve brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects