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South Fork Little Conemaugh River Brook Trout Renewal, Pennsylvania
Deep mining activities along the stream have resulted in chronic AMD into the stream. AMD along with acid deposition have depressed the brook trout and aquatic life in this 4 mile stretch due to low pH, high aluminum, and low alkalinity. The objective of this project is to mitigate the sources of the AMD with limestone beds and mitigate the acid deposition with limestone sand dosing. Restoring the pH and alkalinity regime will allow for a renewed brook trout population and overall aquatic life restoration along 4 miles of stream.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Deep Brook Restoration and Monitoring Program, Connecticut
Deep Brook is a Class 1 Wild Trout Management Area, rare in Connecticut. It had been neglected and developed problems, including a declining population of native brook trout. For three years, TU and its broad partnership have worked to restore the in-stream, riparian and buffer habitat. Funding from this project will be used to implement a comprehensive water monitoring system, a critical component of the multi-year restoration effort in Deep Brook.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Catawissa Creek AMD Restoration, Pennsylvania
An historic mine water discharge tunnel draining a deep mine is contributing 80 percent of the pollution load of acid and aluminum impairing Catawissa Creek. The objective of this project is to complete a limestone mitigation project that will treat the source of AMD and restore the pH regime of the stream. The project will enable the return of extirpated brook trout to 36 miles of the main stem of the Catawissa Creek. It will also reconnect the entire watershed including more than two dozen tributaries, many of which are not impaired and have healthy brook trout populations.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Smethport Reservoir Dam Removal and Habitat Restoration, Pennsylvania
This project seeks to remove the Smethport Reservoir Dam to restore passage and free flowing stream habitat for brook trout on Blacksmith Run and eliminate a significant liability and safety concern and reduce localized flooding. Approximately 1.9 miles of stream will be reopened to fish passage, 770 linear feet of in-stream habitat restored, and 1540 feet of riparian habitat restored. Additional benefits anticipated from the project include improvements in water quality, enhanced transport of nutrients and woody debris, and re-established connectivity between the stream, riparian area and groundwater interface.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Restoring Brook Trout to Aaron Run, Maryland
Project will remediate chronic habitat and water quality problems resulting from historic acid mine drainage (AMD) sources and agricultural practices in four miles of Aaron Run, allowing for the reestablishment of an extirpated native brook trout population. Remediation will also benefit brook trout habitat in the lower Savage River and the upper North Branch Potomac River, and reestablish historic population connections.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
Lynn Camp Prong, Tennessee
One of the top stressors to thriving brook trout populations is their inability to successfully compete for food and space with other, non-native (exotic) trout species such as brown and rainbow trout and warm water species such as small mouth bass. Balancing the needs of multiple fish user groups presents a unique set of challenges in developing strategies to address declines in brook trout populations due to competition from these species. Steve Moore, Fishery Biologist for the National Park Service is leading a partnership to eliminate non-native trout species from Lynn Camp Prong in the Great Smoky Mountains State Park. This effort focuses on the use of chemical means to eliminate rainbow trout from the stream. A natural barrier at the lower end of Lynn Camp Prong will exclude rainbow trout from stream. Approximately 8 miles of stream will be restored allowing brook trout to re-inhabit the stream without the challenge of competing trout species.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
Chop and Drop in the Sunday River, Maine
Brook trout habitat in the Sunday River drainage has been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commercial and recreational development. Much of the river and its tributaries are unstable, over-widened, and lacking in deep pools, thereby reducing nursery and adult brook trout habitat. Although degradation is being addressed through a comprehensive watershed survey and main-stem restoration effort, the causal problem of accelerated runoff has not been addressed. This proposal will assess the efficacy of adding woody debris to reduce peak flows, create pools, and trap organics to enrich depauperate headwater streams.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
Habitat Restoration for Southern Appalachian Brook Trout in 15 Chattahoochee National Forest Streams, Georgia
This project will enhance or restore 7.6 miles of stream for brook trout in the Chattahoochee National Forest.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
South Sandy Creek Restoration, Williams Run, Pennsylvania
The partnership will restore Williams Run so that it can support life, with lime treatments in the short term and by constructing a limestone bed system to passively treat acid mine drainage for the long term. Tributaries flowing into Williams Run currently support healthy populations of wild brook trout. This project will allow currently isolated populations of native brook trout to return to the main stem of Williams Run, connecting them and expanding their range. These water quality improvements on private property will benefit stream habitat downstream on State Forest Lands. The landowners have committed to allowing public fishing in this area greatly expanding the brook trout fishing opportunities in western Pennsylvania.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
Cross Fork Stream Stabilization, Kettle Creek, Pennsylvania
A remarkable potential exists for the successful improvement of habitat to benefit native brook trout populations within Cross Fork through the support of private and public landowners. Immediate habitat improvements can be obtained by means of low impact, habitat enhancement techniques proposed for the project. These include hand placement of log vanes, rootwads, log cross vanes, and mudsills throughout the project reach not only providing habitat, but also assisting the stream in stabilization over time (5-10years). When complete the project will enhance approximately 3.5 miles of habitat impaired stream. Cross Fork does support a resident population of native brook trout that began showing a decrease in population in the last 6-10 years. This is attributed to the loss of quality adult trout habitat and spawning areas as noted by the PA Fish and Boat Commission reports. Recently, due to the decline in trout populations the PA Fish and Boat Commission, has changed the regulation of the stream to a stock trout fishery. It is hoped that habitat restoration efforts will return the population back to self-sustaining.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects