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South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Restoring Connectivity in the Sunday River and Martin Stream Watersheds, Maine
Subwatersheds of the Androscoggin River contain some of the finest intact and healthy brook trout habitat in the state of Maine. This project will remove two fish passage barriers providing a total of six miles of connectivity in the Sunday River and Martin Stream subwatersheds.
Located in Projects / 2013 Projects
Scott Brook Fish Passage Project, Maine
This project will replace an undersized and failing stream crossing on Scott Brook, a wild brook trout stream, with an open bottom arch culvert. Once complete, the project will restore access from Big Lake to approximately 3 miles of stream habitat for brook trout and other native species.
Located in Projects / 2013 Projects
Restoration of Natural Hydrology and Habitat Complexity in the Machias, Rivers, Maine
This project will remove 11 remnant log drive dams and add large woody material to restore fish passage, stream connectivity and natural stream processes that will passively restore cold water habitat in the tributaries of the Machias River. A total of 27.2 miles of stream upstream of the dam sites will be affected by the project.
Located in Projects / 2013 Projects
In-Stream Habitat Restoration in the Meduxnekeag Watershed, Maine
This project will restore 1.9 miles of habitat on the Meduxnekeag River mainstem and 0.25 miles of habitat on its north branch for brook trout within trust land for the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians. The project will return the river to a more natural, sustainable state of in-stream habitat complexity, increase brook trout habitat quality, and promote interest in future restoration activities.
Located in Projects / 2013 Projects
File Restoration of Riverine Process and Habitat Suitability In the Upper Narraguagus River and Northern Stream Focus Areas (Maine)
This project decreases embeddedness by mobilizing the river bed, increasing sediment sorting; increases the number and depth of pools; increases retention of allochthonous organic material that the aquatic food web relies on; reduces the dead waters and over-widened channels in legacy reservoirs; and, increases cold-water fish population resiliency to climate change. The project cost is $155,737 and the estimated socioeconomic benefit is $1.6 million.
Located in Projects / 2019 Projects
File Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH (and High Aluminum) Concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions_FY09 Project
This project demonstrated that clam shells could be utilized to increase pH and decrease detrimental inorganic aluminum concentrations. In Dead Stream, water chemistry has improved by approximately 1.0 pH unit, and total fish densities increased two-fold. In Canaan Brook water chemistry has improved by 1.0 pH unit and First Lake Stream improved by 0.7 pH unit, while fish densities have increased 2- and 6- times, respectively. Macroinvertebrate communities have improved somewhat, especially among mayflies and stoneflies, while amphipods and snails have appeared for the first time. However, even at treated sites, macroinvertebrate communities continue to have low diversity and may not achieve Class A water quality. Overall, by adding buffering capacity, there has been a boost to the bottom of the food chain which has contributed to improved fish abundance and diversity. In the fourth year, biological communities are still adapting to the new conditions.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File Carloe Brook Fish Passage Restoration, ME_FY11 Project
The project replaced an undersized and failing stream crossing on Carloe Brook a major tributary to Clifford Lake that has wild brook trout. This stream crossing currently limits passage for trout and other aquatic organisms. The current crossing is also a significant sediment source due to improper construction and overtopping. The crossing was replaced with a 1.2 bankfull open bottom arch culvert (15ft wide) designed to allow passage at all flows.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File Restoring habitat connectivity in Machias and Saint Croix River tributary streams, ME_FY11 Project
Through this project, Downeast Lakes Land Trust (DLLT) continued its work with partners to restore brook trout habitat on priority streams within its 55,678-acre Downeast Lakes Community Forest by removing passage barriers. Of the four sites included in the original proposal (Billy Brown Brook/Shaw St., Amazon Brook/Amazon Rd., Grand Lake Brook/Fourth Lake Rd., and Fourth Lake Trib./Belden Brook Rd), two were completed using NRCS funding received after the initial proposal was submitted to USFWS. As a result, Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture funding was used to restore fish passage at two additional sites at South Branch/Little River Rd and Towers Brook/Little River Rd.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File chemical/x-pdb Jam Black Brook Culvert Replacement, ME_FY12 Project
The goals of the project were: (1) To remove an obstruction to upstream fish passage for brook trout, Atlantic salmon and other resident and migratory fish. (2) To restore access to 9.8 miles of stream habitat upstream of the obstruction. (3) To restore natural sediment and woody debris transport through the crossing site. (4) To improve flood capacity at the Magog Road crossing, reducing the risk of debris jams or overtopping the road. (5) To provide a demonstration site in mid‐coast Maine for an appropriate stream crossing developed in cooperation with the municipality.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports