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Batten Kill Restoration Near Eagleville, New York
This project will implement stream restoration at five sites along the Batten Kill in New York using principles of fluvial geomorphology to enhance a total of 2 miles of stream for the purposes of: improving brook trout habitat, removing fish passage barriers, stabilizing and restoring streambanks and riparian areas, increasing large woody debris in the river system, providing demonstration projects for the community, and improving fishing access and recreational opportunities.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Batten Kill Restoration Near Eagleville, New York
This project will implement stream restoration at five sites along the Batten Kill in New York using principles of fluvial geomorphology to enhance a total of 2 miles of stream for the purposes of: improving brook trout habitat, removing fish passage barriers, stabilizing and restoring streambanks and riparian areas, increasing large woody debris in the river system, providing demonstration projects for the community, and improving fishing access and recreational opportunities.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
Project Octet Stream Big Run Restoration, West Virginia
The Big Run project is part of Trout Unlimited’s Home Rivers Initiative Potomac Headwaters Restoration Project. The stream has suffered habitat degradation in the riparian zone, stream banks and instream due to long-term livestock grazing. There currently exists a lifetime grazing allotment on that portion of the Monongahela National Forest that supports Big Run. The Forest Service, Trout Unlimited and others have teamed up to work with the allotment holder to fence the riparian zone, create crossings and alternative water sources to completely remove the cattle from the stream. Over time, riparian reforestation will stabilize banks and provide vital shade during warm summer months. This is the initial project on Big Run. Resources have already been secured to move down stream on the Forest and on to private property. The project will include informational and educational kiosks and trails that will improve access for anglers and hikers. The project will restore 45 acres of riparian forest and enhance 1.5 miles of stream habitat.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Brook Trout Restoration and Expansion in Garth Run, Virginia
This project will restore and improve stream and riparian habitat within a 2,357 foot project area located in the headwaters of Garth Run which was severely impacted by catastrophic flooding that occurred in 1995. Wild brook trout were extirpated as a result of habitat degradation which led to increased water temperatures and a lack of complex habitat. Brook trout were re-introduced in 2008 as part of Virginia's Conservation Strategy as the stream has begun to naturally heal itself. This project will restore 2.3 miles of brook trout habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Restoration and Expansion in Garth Run, Virginia
This project will restore and improve stream and riparian habitat within a 2,357 foot project area located in the headwaters of Garth Run which was severely impacted by catastrophic flooding that occurred in 1995. Wild brook trout were extirpated as a result of habitat degradation which led to increased water temperatures and a lack of complex habitat. Brook trout were re-introduced in 2008 as part of Virginia's Conservation Strategy as the stream has begun to naturally heal itself. This project will restore 2.3 miles of brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
Project Troff document Copper Creek In-Stream Habitat Restoration Project
This project improved riparian zones, water quality, appropriate sediment flows and restoring physical habitat for multiple listed aquatic species in the Copper Creek watershed, within the Upper Tennessee River Basin. (Photo: The low water bridge that was removed and replaced with a new bridge that spans the river.)
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Crabtree Swamp Habitat Restoration
The restoration of Crabtree Swamp is an innovative, "first of its kind" project, in which a previously channelized drainage basin is being returned to a blackwater hardwood swamp in which the floodplain is being recreated via earthmoving and replanting into functional habitat for fish, invertebrates and other wildlife. To match resources, the restoration project has been subdivided into 10 reaches.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Culvert Replacement and Instream Habitat Restoration on Indian Stream, New Hampshire
In 2006, an initial watershed based assessment of coldwater habitat conditions was completed by Trout Unlimited in the Upper Connecticut in New Hampshire and Vermont. In 2008, Trout Unlimited designated the Upper Connecticut as one if its Home Rivers Initiatives, the only one in New England. Trout Unlimited's assessment identified fish habitat problems through the watershed, including lack of riparian habitat, poor instream habitat diversity and complexity, and inadequate stream crossings. This project will initiate the first phase of a long term culvert removal and instream habitat program by replacing four high priority culverts and implementing instream woody habitat restorations in Indian Stream, starting on the East Branch. The culverts to be replaced are on four important brook trout nursery streams: Dry Creek, Johns Brook, Hidden Brook, and Alder Brook. The project will restore 3 miles of habitat on east branch, the largest tributary to Indian Stream.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Culvert Replacement and Instream Habitat Restoration on Indian Stream, New Hampshire
In 2006, an initial watershed based assessment of coldwater habitat conditions was completed by Trout Unlimited in the Upper Connecticut in New Hampshire and Vermont. In 2008, Trout Unlimited designated the Upper Connecticut as one if its Home Rivers Initiatives, the only one in New England. Trout Unlimited's assessment identified fish habitat problems through the watershed, including lack of riparian habitat, poor instream habitat diversity and complexity, and inadequate stream crossings. This project will initiate the first phase of a long term culvert removal and instream habitat program by replacing four high priority culverts and implementing instream woody habitat restorations in Indian Stream, starting on the East Branch. The culverts to be replaced are on four important brook trout nursery streams: Dry Creek, Johns Brook, Hidden Brook, and Alder Brook. The project will restore 3 miles of habitat on east branch, the largest tributary to Indian Stream.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
File Dynamics and regulation of the southern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population in an Appalachian stream
1. We used information theoretic statistics [Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC)] and regression analysis in a multiple hypothesis testing approach to assess the processes capable of explaining long-term demographic variation in a lightly exploited brook trout population in Ball Creek, NC. We sampled a 100-m-long second-order site during both spring and autumn 1991–2004, using three-pass electrofishing. 2. Principle component analysis indicated that the site had lower average velocity, greater amounts of depositional substrata and lower amount of erosional substrata during the 1999–2002 drought than in non-drought years. In addition, drought years had lower flows, and lower variation in flows, than non-drought years. 3. Both young-of-the-year (YOY) and adult densities varied by an order of magnitude during the study. AIC analysis conducted on regressions of per capita rate of increase versus various population and habitat parameters for the population, adults and YOY, for both spring and autumn data sets, indicated that simple density dependence almost always was the only interpretable model with Akaike weights (wi) ranging from 0.262 to 0.836. 4. Growth analyses yielded more variable results, with simple density dependence being the only interpretable model for both adult spring data (wi = 0.999) and YOY autumn data (wi = 0.905), and positive density dependence (wi = 0.636) and simple density independence (wi = 0.241) representing interpretable models for spring YOY data. 5. We detected a significant stock–recruitment relationship between both spring and autumn densities of adults in year t and autumn YOY density in year t + 1. Finally, spring YOY density was positively correlated with both autumn YOY density and spring mean YOY standard length (SL), suggesting that processes affecting recruitment show residual effects at least in the first year of life. This population appears to be regulated primarily by density dependent processes, although high flows also negatively affected mean SLs of YOY.
Located in Resources / Brook Trout Related Publications