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File Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH (and High Aluminum) Concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions_FY09 Project
This project demonstrated that clam shells could be utilized to increase pH and decrease detrimental inorganic aluminum concentrations. In Dead Stream, water chemistry has improved by approximately 1.0 pH unit, and total fish densities increased two-fold. In Canaan Brook water chemistry has improved by 1.0 pH unit and First Lake Stream improved by 0.7 pH unit, while fish densities have increased 2- and 6- times, respectively. Macroinvertebrate communities have improved somewhat, especially among mayflies and stoneflies, while amphipods and snails have appeared for the first time. However, even at treated sites, macroinvertebrate communities continue to have low diversity and may not achieve Class A water quality. Overall, by adding buffering capacity, there has been a boost to the bottom of the food chain which has contributed to improved fish abundance and diversity. In the fourth year, biological communities are still adapting to the new conditions.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
Person Troff document Calvert, Patrick
Located in Members
Project Channel, Bank, & Riparian Restoration to Improve Habitat and Water Quality in Kings River, AR
The natural course and riparian corridor of the Kings River have been significantly modified by various landowners over several decades, leading to channel instability and decreased habitat and water quality. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) purchased a preserve on the Kings River that includes nine miles of river. To protect and restore river and riparian habitat, TNC has created a stream channel and floodplain restoration project along 0.5 miles of the river.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Chipola River Watershed Restoration Listed Mussels and Black Bass Initiative
The Chipola River Watershed (HUC # 03130012) is located in northwest Florida/southeast Alabama and includes parts of Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf, Washington and Bay Counties in Florida and Geneva and Houston Counties in Alabama. Some of the smaller tributaries that encompass the Chipola River watershed include: Chipola River Dead Lakes, Spring Creek, Muddy Branch and Otter Creek (subunit 020, 050). The Chipola River Watershed traverses over 100 miles through 812,800 acres with 200,000 acres being utilized in crop production, which is vital to the economy of the region and is the primary socio-economic resource. The Chipola River is defined by Northwest Florida Water Management District as a major Florida river. It originates from freshwater springs in the upper watershed and accounts for approximately 20% of the waters to the Apalachicola River, which is the largest river in Florida. High base flow in Chipola River is supported by over 63 known Floridan aquifer springs. The Chipola River is defined by Florida Department of Environmental Protection as an “Outstanding Florida Waterbody”. However, threats have been identified that could degrade water quality, reduce habitat, or negatively impact rare or imperiled species within the Chipola River watershed. In the past three decades, nitrate concentrations in spring waters have increased substantially in northern and central Florida. Jackson Blue, a tributary to the Chipola and first magnitude spring has the second highest concentration of nitrates of any spring in Florida. The Chipola River and its subunits Dead Lakes (WBID 51B), Muddy Branch (WBID 175) and Otter Creek are 303(d) listed due to agricultural non-point source pollution within the watershed area (EPD 305b report). A great diversity of habitats exist within the watershed from xeric upland longleaf pine forests, to bottomland hardwood swamps, freshwater wetlands, numerous natural springs, and meandering creeks with multiple tributaries. These habitats support rich animal communities with several hundred species of fish and wildlife. There are six federally threatened and endangered mussels species that occur within the Chipola River i.e., oval pigtoe, fat three-ridge, Chipola slabshell, Gulf moccasinshell, purple bankclimber, and shinyrayed pocketbook. The Chipola River is also a managed resource for striped bass and the unique shoal bass fishery. Other threatened and endangered species include: Amphibians & reptiles- American alligator, eastern indigo snake and flatwoods salamander; Fish; Gulf sturgeon; Birds; Arctic peregrine falcon, southeastern kestrel, bald eagle, wood stork, red-cockaded woodpecker; Mammals: i.e. Indiana bat and gray bat. Chipola plants listed on the state or federal endangered list include Marianna columbine, sicklepod, and Apalachicola wild indigo. Endangered and threatened species under serious threat from habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation have been documented and a watershed based plan of action should be developed and initiated for their recovery. A Chipola River watershed partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) have been initiated since 2006. The purpose was to develop and lead a research-based platform for environmental restoration and conservation. The Service, along with FWC, West Florida RC&D; Council and others developed a Chipola River Watershed Management Plan (CRWMP) to achieve management and conservation of fish and wildlife resources. This proposal is for the next steps toward management activities under the CRWMP.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Troff document Copper Creek In-Stream Habitat Restoration Project
This project improved riparian zones, water quality, appropriate sediment flows and restoring physical habitat for multiple listed aquatic species in the Copper Creek watershed, within the Upper Tennessee River Basin. (Photo: The low water bridge that was removed and replaced with a new bridge that spans the river.)
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Crabtree Swamp Habitat Restoration
The restoration of Crabtree Swamp is an innovative, "first of its kind" project, in which a previously channelized drainage basin is being returned to a blackwater hardwood swamp in which the floodplain is being recreated via earthmoving and replanting into functional habitat for fish, invertebrates and other wildlife. To match resources, the restoration project has been subdivided into 10 reaches.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project shell script Develop Artificial Estuarine Habitats in SC to Increase Abundance of Recreationally-Important Fish
This project will develop artificial estuarine habitats to increase abundance of recreationally important fish within South Carolina.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project Erosion control in Doe/Mill/Wildcat Branch Watershed, Winston County, Alabama, to benefit Rush Darter
This project will reduce the threat to one of the last surviving populations of rush darter (Etheostoma phytophylum)in the Doe/Mill/Wildcat Branch Watershed in Winston County, Alabama to prevent the need for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project chemical/x-pdb Gravel Augmentation at Spawning Habitats in the Oconee and Ogeechee Rivers of Georgia
The robust redhorse (Moxostoma robustum), a species that had been lost to science for about 150 years, was discovered on the Oconee River in 1991. Wild populations subsequently found in the Savannah River (Georgia/South Carolina) and Pee Dee River (North Carolina) have been augmented by stocking in other areas of Georgia and South Carolina. The species is very particular about the water quality and depth as well as the gravel quality of its spawning sites. To encourage propagation of this native species, the Robust Redhorse Conservation Committee coordinates activities in several southeastern states. The gravel augmentation is expected to benefit invertebrates, including mussels, as well as anadromous species such as striped bass, American shad, and Atlantic sturgeon.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B
Project chemical/x-pdb Green River Enhancement within the Green River WMA, KY
The Green River and Green River Lake and provide aquatic habitat in the Green River Wildlife Management Area. The river is in declining condition due to severe erosion over almost four decades. Its restoration can allow it to support thriving populations of white bass, smallmouth bass, rock bass, flathead catfish, walleye, and muskellunge, and provide sport challenges to anglers.
Located in Funded Projects / SARP Projects W2B