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File ECMAScript program A Map of Maine Wild Brook Trout Patches
The map provides a visual depiction of the distribution of Maine's wild Brook Trout patches.
Located in Resources / State Maps of Wild Brook Trout Patch Distribution
File Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH (and High Aluminum) Concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions_FY09 Project
This project demonstrated that clam shells could be utilized to increase pH and decrease detrimental inorganic aluminum concentrations. In Dead Stream, water chemistry has improved by approximately 1.0 pH unit, and total fish densities increased two-fold. In Canaan Brook water chemistry has improved by 1.0 pH unit and First Lake Stream improved by 0.7 pH unit, while fish densities have increased 2- and 6- times, respectively. Macroinvertebrate communities have improved somewhat, especially among mayflies and stoneflies, while amphipods and snails have appeared for the first time. However, even at treated sites, macroinvertebrate communities continue to have low diversity and may not achieve Class A water quality. Overall, by adding buffering capacity, there has been a boost to the bottom of the food chain which has contributed to improved fish abundance and diversity. In the fourth year, biological communities are still adapting to the new conditions.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions, Maine
This project will assess if clam shell additions will increase in-stream pH and decrease organic aluminum concentrations in headwater brook trout streams in Maine. Two tributaries included in this study currently do not sustain fish, even though they contain high quality habitat for fish. The likely reason for fish absence is thought to be low pH and subsequently high aluminum. The clam shell industry in Maine currently pays for discarding shells shucked at processing facilities. If this project is successful, it would allow us to use a waste product to help remediate low pH and subsequent high labial aluminum issues in brook trout streams.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Assessing the Efficacy of Remediating Episodic Low pH concentrations in Headwater Brook Trout Streams with Clam Shell Additions, Maine
This project will assess if clam shell additions will increase in-stream pH and decrease organic aluminum concentrations in headwater brook trout streams in Maine. Two tributaries included in this study currently do not sustain fish, even though they contain high quality habitat for fish. The likely reason for fish absence is thought to be low pH and subsequently high aluminum. The clam shell industry in Maine currently pays for discarding shells shucked at processing facilities. If this project is successful, it would allow us to use a waste product to help remediate low pH and subsequent high labial aluminum issues in brook trout streams.
Located in Projects / 2009 Projects
File Carloe Brook Fish Passage Restoration, ME_FY11 Project
The project replaced an undersized and failing stream crossing on Carloe Brook a major tributary to Clifford Lake that has wild brook trout. This stream crossing currently limits passage for trout and other aquatic organisms. The current crossing is also a significant sediment source due to improper construction and overtopping. The crossing was replaced with a 1.2 bankfull open bottom arch culvert (15ft wide) designed to allow passage at all flows.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
Carloe Brook Fish Passage Restoration Project, Washington County, Maine
This project will replace an undersized and failing stream crossing on Carloe Brook, a major tributary to Clifford Lake, a wild brook trout water. This stream crossing currently limits passage for trout and other aquatic organisms. The crossing will be replaced with a bottomless arch culvert designed to allow flows at all levels. This will open approximately 3 miles of passage for brook trout and other aquatic organisms.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Carloe Brook Fish Passage Restoration Project, Washington County, Maine
This project will replace an undersized and failing stream crossing on Carloe Brook, a major tributary to Clifford Lake, a wild brook trout water. This stream crossing currently limits passage for trout and other aquatic organisms. The crossing will be replaced with a bottomless arch culvert designed to allow flows at all levels. This will open approximately 3 miles of passage for brook trout and other aquatic organisms.
Located in Projects / 2011 Projects
Chop and Drop in Sunday River, Maine
The objectives of this project are to restore riverine and riparian habitats as well as to improve ecological stream processes for native brook trout in the Sunday River drainage. Stream habitats in this drainage have been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commerical and recreational development. A half mile long treatment of each of two tributaries will receive woody debris. These tributaries and a nearby control will be monitored for geomorphic, chemical, biological, and flow responses.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Chop and Drop in Sunday River, Maine
The objectives of this project are to restore riverine and riparian habitats as well as to improve ecological stream processes for native brook trout in the Sunday River drainage. Stream habitats in this drainage have been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commerical and recreational development. A half mile long treatment of each of two tributaries will receive woody debris. These tributaries and a nearby control will be monitored for geomorphic, chemical, biological, and flow responses.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Chop and Drop in the Sunday River, Maine
Brook trout habitat in the Sunday River drainage has been degraded by poor land use practices, including timber harvesting, log driving, farming, and commercial and recreational development. Much of the river and its tributaries are unstable, over-widened, and lacking in deep pools, thereby reducing nursery and adult brook trout habitat. Although degradation is being addressed through a comprehensive watershed survey and main-stem restoration effort, the causal problem of accelerated runoff has not been addressed. This proposal will assess the efficacy of adding woody debris to reduce peak flows, create pools, and trap organics to enrich depauperate headwater streams.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects