Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home

Search results

173 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type
















New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Lake Champlain, Vermont
Sedimentation, increased water temperature, barriers to passage and lack of riparian vegetation have been identified as the major threats to Vermont's brook trout population. The project includes has two principle efforts underway: installation of livestock fencing, alternative water systems, and planting native trees and shrubs to restore degraded riparian areas and the replacement of an existing failed culvert with a bridge to allow for the year round upstream movement of brook trout on Stevensville Brook.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Leadmine Brook Fish Passage and Habitat Restoration Project, Connecticut
This project will restore upstream fish passage and in-stream habitats for wild brook trout populations at the Axe Factory Road Crossing and provide access to over 2.94 miles of upstream brook trout habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Leadmine Brook Fish Passage and Habitat Restoration Project, Connecticut
This project will restore upstream fish passage and in-stream habitats for wild brook trout populations at the Axe Factory Road Crossing and provide access to over 2.94 miles of upstream brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2009 Projects
Lynn Camp Prong, Tennessee
One of the top stressors to thriving brook trout populations is their inability to successfully compete for food and space with other, non-native (exotic) trout species such as brown and rainbow trout and warm water species such as small mouth bass. Balancing the needs of multiple fish user groups presents a unique set of challenges in developing strategies to address declines in brook trout populations due to competition from these species. Steve Moore, Fishery Biologist for the National Park Service is leading a partnership to eliminate non-native trout species from Lynn Camp Prong in the Great Smoky Mountains State Park. This effort focuses on the use of chemical means to eliminate rainbow trout from the stream. A natural barrier at the lower end of Lynn Camp Prong will exclude rainbow trout from stream. Approximately 8 miles of stream will be restored allowing brook trout to re-inhabit the stream without the challenge of competing trout species.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Lynn Camp Prong, Tennessee
One of the top stressors to thriving brook trout populations is their inability to successfully compete for food and space with other, non-native (exotic) trout species such as brown and rainbow trout and warm water species such as small mouth bass. Balancing the needs of multiple fish user groups presents a unique set of challenges in developing strategies to address declines in brook trout populations due to competition from these species. Steve Moore, Fishery Biologist for the National Park Service is leading a partnership to eliminate non-native trout species from Lynn Camp Prong in the Great Smoky Mountains State Park. This effort focuses on the use of chemical means to eliminate rainbow trout from the stream. A natural barrier at the lower end of Lynn Camp Prong will exclude rainbow trout from stream. Approximately 8 miles of stream will be restored allowing brook trout to re-inhabit the stream without the challenge of competing trout species.
Located in Projects / 2007 Projects
Marshall Brook Culvert Replacement, Hancock County, Maine
This project will replace two existing undersized, improperly set round culvert inhibiting fish passage at the road / stream crossing of Marshall Brook with the Seal Cove Road in Southwest Harbor, Maine with an open bottom culvert. This will provide 4 miles of passage and reconnect a historic sea run brook trout stream with the estuary at Bass Harbor.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Marshall Brook Culvert Replacement, Hancock County, Maine
This project will replace two existing undersized, improperly set round culvert inhibiting fish passage at the road / stream crossing of Marshall Brook with the Seal Cove Road in Southwest Harbor, Maine with an open bottom culvert. This will provide 4 miles of passage and reconnect a historic sea run brook trout stream with the estuary at Bass Harbor.
Located in Projects / 2011 Projects
Nash Stream Restoration Project, Coos County, New Hampshire
This project will restore approximately 5.5 miles of instream habitat on the mainstem of Nash Stream between its confluence with Emerson and Long Mountain Brooks. Restoration activities will include boulder placement, pool construction, large wood additions, floodplain reconnection, and riparian vegetation.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Nash Stream Restoration Project, Coos County, New Hampshire
This project will restore approximately 5.5 miles of instream habitat on the mainstem of Nash Stream between its confluence with Emerson and Long Mountain Brooks. Restoration activities will include boulder placement, pool construction, large wood additions, floodplain reconnection, and riparian vegetation.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
North River Stream Channel Restoration, Augusta County, Virgina
This project will advance restoration on a 0.75 mile reach of North River in Augusta County, Virginia, within the George Washington National Forest. The purpose of the immediate project is to install a series of cross-vein and J-structure in-stream devices to stabilize flows and to create and maintain low water pools that will serve as essential brook trout habitat during droughts and seasonal low flow periods. It continues a long-term program to restore pool habitat to a historically important brook trout fishery.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects