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Project Octet Stream Restoring Aquatic Organism Passage within Tipton Creek, North Carolina
Tipton Creek is located within the Upper Tellico Off-Highway Vehicle Area on the Tusquitee Ranger District of the Nantahala National Forest. The entire watershed is in public ownership except for several small private inholdings, one of which is along a middle reach of Tipton Creek. Currently the Forest Service is evaluatingalternatives for future management of the Off-Highway Vehicle Area because of significant resources damage, particularly to streams and resident brook trout populations. This project will be the first of several designed to reconnect and restore brook trout habitat and populations within the Tellico River watershed. It will remove one barrier on Tipton Creek in the Upper Tellico River Watershed to reconnect approximately 4 miles of stream.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
Project chemical/x-pdb Brook Trout Catchment Scale and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
Climate change is currently a high risk threat to the current range of the brook trout due to changing thermal regimes. The effects of climate change may be exacerbated by greater fragmentation from land use changes. In order to effectively rank projects and work strategically, the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture is working on refining the status map to the catchment scale and establishing climate change resiliency rankings for brook trout populations throughout the partnership boundary from Georgia to Maine. JMU in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the Service have initiated efforts to determine resiliency rankings for brook trout populations in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia. This project will allow the partnerhsip to expand this analysis to cover all brook trout habitat from Georgia to Maine.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
Project Octet Stream Removal of Two Dams in the Wetmore Run Watershed, Potter County, PA
This project will remove the only two dams in the Wetmore Run Watershed in Potter County, Pennsylvania opening 8.5 miles of habitat for brook trout. Removal of the dams will also eliminate thermal pollution and restore lotic ecosystem function.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
Brook Trout Catchment Scale and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
Climate change is currently a high risk threat to the current range of the brook trout due to changing thermal regimes. The effects of climate change may be exacerbated by greater fragmentation from land use changes. In order to effectively rank projects and work strategically, the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture is working on refining the status map to the catchment scale and establishing climate change resiliency rankings for brook trout populations throughout the partnership boundary from Georgia to Maine. JMU in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the Service have initiated efforts to determine resiliency rankings for brook trout populations in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia. This project will allow the partnership to expand this analysis to cover all brook trout habitat from Georgia to Maine.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
Upper Shavers Fork Aquatic Passage Project, West Virginia
This project seeks to restore habitat linkages between two spawning tributaries and the mainstem of Upper Shaver's Fork between Cheat Bridge and Spruce, West Virginia. Poor tributary-mainstem connections continue to threaten the sustainability and expansion of brook trout populations in genetically isolated tributaries as well as those in the mainstem of Upper Shaver's Fork. To address these problems, two blocking railroad culverts will be replaced with passage-friendly culverts to provide over 8 miles of passage for brook trout.
Located in Projects / 2011 Projects
Brook Trout Restoration and Expansion in Garth Run, Virginia
This project will restore and improve stream and riparian habitat within a 2,357 foot project area located in the headwaters of Garth Run which was severely impacted by catastrophic flooding that occurred in 1995. Wild brook trout were extirpated as a result of habitat degradation which led to increased water temperatures and a lack of complex habitat. Brook trout were re-introduced in 2008 as part of Virginia's Conservation Strategy as the stream has begun to naturally heal itself. This project will restore 2.3 miles of brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
South Branch of Kinzua Creek Acid Precipitation Remediation Project, Pennsylvania
This project is a design/construct/implementation/research project located in Allegheny National Forest, in Hamlin and Wetmore Townships, McKean County that when completed will restore water quality and reestablish recruitment of brook trout within approximately 5 miles of stream. Three acid precipitation impaired tributaries of the South Branch of Kinzua Creek will be treated and restored in concert with routine Forest Service road maintenance by constructing innovative passive treatment systems that will supply buffering capacity to the watershed via the roads stormwater management facility.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
West Virginia Brook Trout Distribution Assessment
The EBTJV range wide assessment of brook trout identified a distinct gap in our knowledge of the status and distribution of brook trout in West Virginia. This project will compile existing data on brook trout in southeastern West Virginia, conduct field surveys to fill in gaps, and collect samples for micro-satellite DNA analysis. The results will be used to produce a quality assured GIS based data set for the entire state of West Virginia that includes spatially explicit information on brook trout reproduction, population status, habitat and water quality.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Lake Champlain, Vermont
Sedimentation, increased water temperature, barriers to passage and lack of riparian vegetation have been identified as the major threats to Vermont's brook trout population. The project includes has two principle efforts underway: installation of livestock fencing, alternative water systems, and planting native trees and shrubs to restore degraded riparian areas and the replacement of an existing failed culvert with a bridge to allow for the year round upstream movement of brook trout on Stevensville Brook.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects