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2016 Projects

This folder contains information on the three habitat projects funded in FY16. Collectively these projects will remove 6 fish passage barriers to reconnect 5.25 miles of habitat and restore 0.68 miles of in-stream habitat for native brook trout. These projects were funded by the EBTJV and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for $86,903. An additional $435,400 in partner contributions are expected. The estimated socioeconomic value of these projects is $3.3 million.

Sparta Glen Brook Restoration NJ

The purpose of the project is to restore critical instream habitat within Sparta Glen Brook, including natural pool regimes and spawning areas, restore toe of slope protection, further stabilize upland fringe areas, as well as the riparian corridor along a 0.68 mile stretch. The project will result in an increase in the trout population, reduce sedimentation and protect the stream from future storm events.

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Little Cards Brook Culvert Replacement, Franklin ME

Little Cards Brook Culvert Replacement, Franklin ME

This project will replace an undersized and failing stream crossing on Little Cards Brook, a wild brook trout water. It will also fix a chronic sedimentation problem that is detrimental to the health of the stream and Great Pond. The project will result in improved access over Little Cards Brook and enhancement of native brook trout habitat.

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Beebe River Watershed Connectivity Project, Campton and Sandwich, NH

Beebe River Watershed Connectivity Project, Campton and Sandwich, NH

This project includes the removal and replacement of five stream crossings in the Beebe River Watershed on a 5,435 acre parcel recently acquired by The Conservation Fund. These crossings are on five separate tributary streams that flow into the Beebe River in Campton and Sandwich, NH. Wild brook trout have been documented in all of these streams and the watershed area upstream of this property is completely encompassed within the White Mountain National Forest. This project restores watershed level function by providing over 5 miles of accessible thermal refuge and spawning locations in 5 high priority locations along about 30% of the entire length of the Beebe River. 2015 summer temperature data indicates survival in the Beebe River is likely compromised without access to these tributaries.

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