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File text/texmacs Estimating the Socioeconomic Benefits Derived from EBTJV Brook Trout Conservation Projects
This document describes the methodology for estimating the socioeconomic benefits derived from EBTJV Brook Trout conservation projects.
Located in Groups / Steering Committee
File Octet Stream Revised Project Review Criteria
This document contains draft revisions to the EBTJV's project review criteria.
Located in Groups / / 2017 Steering Committee Conference Call Summaries / June 20, 2017 EBTJV SC Conference Call
File chemical/x-pdb Tipton Creek Culvert Replacement, NC_FY10 Project
In the summer of 2011 the culvert at the Davis Creek Road (FSR 420) crossing of Tipton Creek was removed and replaced with a concrete arch, stream simulation crossing for the purpose of passing aquatic organisms, where the existing culvert was known to be a barrier to aquatic passage due to velocity and outlet drop. The crossing was sized using the 100-year flow calculation derived from the USGS Regression Equation for the mountains of North Carolina. Additionally, the width of the crossing was designed to accommodate a bankfull flow channel dimension plus a small area of floodplain. The channel was reconstructed through the crossing using the dimension, pattern, and profile of the reference reach upstream. The new channel was constructed using imported boulders and onsite alluvial materials. Grass seed was sown, and trees and shrubs were planted, both potted and live-stakes. Over the last year since construction, the site has experienced several small flood events. The site remains stable, passable to all aquatic species, and looks more and more natural every year as planted and natural vegetation establishes.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File Troff document FY 16 EBTJV Operations Project
This document describes the operational tasks that will be performed under a project to be supported by FY16 FWS-NFHAP funding.
Located in Groups / / 2015 Steering Committee Conference Call Summaries / December 15, 2015 SC Documents
Project Pascal source code 2014 Restoring Habitat Connectivity, Machias & Saint Croix River tributary streams ME: EBTJV&NFHAP
Downeast Lakes Land Trust (DLLT) will continue its work with partners to restore brook trout habitat on priority streams in the headwaters of the Machias River and the west branch of the Saint Croix River by removing passage barriers.
Located in Projects / 2014 Projects
West Virginia Brook Trout Distribution Assessment
The EBTJV range wide assessment of brook trout identified a distinct gap in our knowledge of the status and distribution of brook trout in West Virginia. This project will compile existing data on brook trout in southeastern West Virginia, conduct field surveys to fill in gaps, and collect samples for micro-satellite DNA analysis. The results will be used to produce a quality assured GIS based data set for the entire state of West Virginia that includes spatially explicit information on brook trout reproduction, population status, habitat and water quality.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
South Bog Stream Restoration Project, Maine
South Bog Stream is a tributary of Rangeley Lake in Franklin County, Maine. Historically, the stream was known as the lake’s primary brook trout spawning tributary and it still supports a population of wild brook trout. However, Rangeley Lake, once known for its large brook trout, no longer has a thriving wild brook trout fishery. South Bog Stream no longer contributes a substantial number of brook trout to the lake. This fact is one possible reason for the decline of Rangeley’s renowned brook trout fishery. A 2001 stream survey revealed habitat degradation along the lower reaches of the 6.3-milelong stream, presumably as a result of the log-driving era in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sections of the stream are shallow and wide. There are very few deep pools which provide essential habitat for brook trout. Because of habitat degradation, the stream produces fewer trout than it did prior to stream alterations over a century ago. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is restoring sections of the stream by rebuilding pools, narrowing and deepening the channel.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Lake Champlain, Vermont
Sedimentation, increased water temperature, barriers to passage and lack of riparian vegetation have been identified as the major threats to Vermont's brook trout population. The project includes has two principle efforts underway: installation of livestock fencing, alternative water systems, and planting native trees and shrubs to restore degraded riparian areas and the replacement of an existing failed culvert with a bridge to allow for the year round upstream movement of brook trout on Stevensville Brook.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Cooper Creek, Georgia
This project will restore over 1.6 miles of Southern Appalachian brook trout habitat contained within the Cooper Creek Watershed of the Chattahoochee National Forest in Georgia. Habitat within Bryant Creek and Tretty and Burnett Branches will be restored using only hand labor to minimize soil disturbance. After non-native trout species are removed, trees will be cut into and across the various stream reaches to provide in-stream cover and create pool habitat for brook trout.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Big Run Restoration, West Virginia
The Big Run project is part of Trout Unlimited’s Home Rivers Initiative Potomac Headwaters Restoration Project. The stream has suffered habitat degradation in the riparian zone, stream banks and instream due to long-term livestock grazing. There currently exists a lifetime grazing allotment on that portion of the Monongahela National Forest that supports Big Run. The Forest Service, Trout Unlimited and others have teamed up to work with the allotment holder to fence the riparian zone, create crossings and alternative water sources to completely remove the cattle from the stream. Over time, riparian reforestation will stabilize banks and provide vital shade during warm summer months. This is the initial project on Big Run. Resources have already been secured to move down stream on the Forest and on to private property. The project will include informational and educational kiosks and trails that will improve access for anglers and hikers. The project will restore 45 acres of riparian forest and enhance 1.5 miles of stream habitat.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects