Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home

Search results

165 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type
















New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Batten Kill Restoration Near Eagleville, New York
This project will implement stream restoration at five sites along the Batten Kill in New York using principles of fluvial geomorphology to enhance a total of 2 miles of stream for the purposes of: improving brook trout habitat, removing fish passage barriers, stabilizing and restoring streambanks and riparian areas, increasing large woody debris in the river system, providing demonstration projects for the community, and improving fishing access and recreational opportunities.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
Big Run Restoration, West Virginia
The Big Run project is part of Trout Unlimited’s Home Rivers Initiative Potomac Headwaters Restoration Project. The stream has suffered habitat degradation in the riparian zone, stream banks and instream due to long-term livestock grazing. There currently exists a lifetime grazing allotment on that portion of the Monongahela National Forest that supports Big Run. The Forest Service, Trout Unlimited and others have teamed up to work with the allotment holder to fence the riparian zone, create crossings and alternative water sources to completely remove the cattle from the stream. Over time, riparian reforestation will stabilize banks and provide vital shade during warm summer months. This is the initial project on Big Run. Resources have already been secured to move down stream on the Forest and on to private property. The project will include informational and educational kiosks and trails that will improve access for anglers and hikers. The project will restore 45 acres of riparian forest and enhance 1.5 miles of stream habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Big Run Restoration, West Virginia
The Big Run project is part of Trout Unlimited’s Home Rivers Initiative Potomac Headwaters Restoration Project. The stream has suffered habitat degradation in the riparian zone, stream banks and instream due to long-term livestock grazing. There currently exists a lifetime grazing allotment on that portion of the Monongahela National Forest that supports Big Run. The Forest Service, Trout Unlimited and others have teamed up to work with the allotment holder to fence the riparian zone, create crossings and alternative water sources to completely remove the cattle from the stream. Over time, riparian reforestation will stabilize banks and provide vital shade during warm summer months. This is the initial project on Big Run. Resources have already been secured to move down stream on the Forest and on to private property. The project will include informational and educational kiosks and trails that will improve access for anglers and hikers. The project will restore 45 acres of riparian forest and enhance 1.5 miles of stream habitat.
Located in Projects / 2006 Projects
Brook Trout Catchment Scale and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
Climate change is currently a high risk threat to the current range of the brook trout due to changing thermal regimes. The effects of climate change may be exacerbated by greater fragmentation from land use changes. In order to effectively rank projects and work strategically, the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture is working on refining the status map to the catchment scale and establishing climate change resiliency rankings for brook trout populations throughout the partnership boundary from Georgia to Maine. JMU in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the Service have initiated efforts to determine resiliency rankings for brook trout populations in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia. This project will allow the partnerhsip to expand this analysis to cover all brook trout habitat from Georgia to Maine.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Catchment Scale and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
Climate change is currently a high risk threat to the current range of the brook trout due to changing thermal regimes. The effects of climate change may be exacerbated by greater fragmentation from land use changes. In order to effectively rank projects and work strategically, the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture is working on refining the status map to the catchment scale and establishing climate change resiliency rankings for brook trout populations throughout the partnership boundary from Georgia to Maine. JMU in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the Service have initiated efforts to determine resiliency rankings for brook trout populations in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia. This project will allow the partnership to expand this analysis to cover all brook trout habitat from Georgia to Maine.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
Project chemical/x-pdb Brook Trout Catchment Scale and Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
Climate change is currently a high risk threat to the current range of the brook trout due to changing thermal regimes. The effects of climate change may be exacerbated by greater fragmentation from land use changes. In order to effectively rank projects and work strategically, the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture is working on refining the status map to the catchment scale and establishing climate change resiliency rankings for brook trout populations throughout the partnership boundary from Georgia to Maine. JMU in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service and the Service have initiated efforts to determine resiliency rankings for brook trout populations in Virginia, Maryland and West Virginia. This project will allow the partnerhsip to expand this analysis to cover all brook trout habitat from Georgia to Maine.
Located in Projects / 2012 Projects
Brook Trout Habitat Improvements to McIntosh Brook, Allegany State Park, New York
Allegheny State Park contains the most intact and widespread distribution of wild brook trout streams in western New York. Brook trout growth and abundance in McIntosh Creek are limited by a lack of large woody debris and deep water pools during summer low flow conditions. This project will add large woody debris to enhance habitat structure and deep water pools to increase wild brook trout growth and abundance, and improve the recreational fishery. Pre- and post-enhancement monitoring will be conducted and used to demonstrate this simple and low cost approach to improve brook trout habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Habitat Improvements to McIntosh Brook, Allegany State Park, New York
Allegheny State Park contains the most intact and widespread distribution of wild brook trout streams in western New York. Brook trout growth and abundance in McIntosh Creek are limited by a lack of large woody debris and deep water pools during summer low flow conditions. This project will add large woody debris to enhance habitat structure and deep water pools to increase wild brook trout growth and abundance, and improve the recreational fishery. Pre- and post-enhancement monitoring will be conducted and used to demonstrate this simple and low cost approach to improve brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2008 Projects
Brook Trout Restoration and Expansion in Garth Run, Virginia
This project will restore and improve stream and riparian habitat within a 2,357 foot project area located in the headwaters of Garth Run which was severely impacted by catastrophic flooding that occurred in 1995. Wild brook trout were extirpated as a result of habitat degradation which led to increased water temperatures and a lack of complex habitat. Brook trout were re-introduced in 2008 as part of Virginia's Conservation Strategy as the stream has begun to naturally heal itself. This project will restore 2.3 miles of brook trout habitat.
Located in Funded Projects / EBTJV Projects
Brook Trout Restoration and Expansion in Garth Run, Virginia
This project will restore and improve stream and riparian habitat within a 2,357 foot project area located in the headwaters of Garth Run which was severely impacted by catastrophic flooding that occurred in 1995. Wild brook trout were extirpated as a result of habitat degradation which led to increased water temperatures and a lack of complex habitat. Brook trout were re-introduced in 2008 as part of Virginia's Conservation Strategy as the stream has begun to naturally heal itself. This project will restore 2.3 miles of brook trout habitat.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects