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File D source code Culvert Replacement and Stream Restoration in Wolfden Run, Garrett County, Maryland
This project enhances 3 miles of in-stream habitat and restores upstream fish passage to 2.76 miles of Brook Trout habitat, reducing habitat fragmentation in the Upper Potomac River watershed. The project cost is $176,550 and the estimated socioeconomic benefit is $1.5 million.
Located in Projects / 2019 Projects
File Restoring habitat connectivity in Machias and Saint Croix River tributary streams, ME_FY11 Project
Through this project, Downeast Lakes Land Trust (DLLT) continued its work with partners to restore brook trout habitat on priority streams within its 55,678-acre Downeast Lakes Community Forest by removing passage barriers. Of the four sites included in the original proposal (Billy Brown Brook/Shaw St., Amazon Brook/Amazon Rd., Grand Lake Brook/Fourth Lake Rd., and Fourth Lake Trib./Belden Brook Rd), two were completed using NRCS funding received after the initial proposal was submitted to USFWS. As a result, Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture funding was used to restore fish passage at two additional sites at South Branch/Little River Rd and Towers Brook/Little River Rd.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File chemical/x-pdb Jam Black Brook Culvert Replacement, ME_FY12 Project
The goals of the project were: (1) To remove an obstruction to upstream fish passage for brook trout, Atlantic salmon and other resident and migratory fish. (2) To restore access to 9.8 miles of stream habitat upstream of the obstruction. (3) To restore natural sediment and woody debris transport through the crossing site. (4) To improve flood capacity at the Magog Road crossing, reducing the risk of debris jams or overtopping the road. (5) To provide a demonstration site in mid‐coast Maine for an appropriate stream crossing developed in cooperation with the municipality.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File Carloe Brook Fish Passage Restoration, ME_FY11 Project
The project replaced an undersized and failing stream crossing on Carloe Brook a major tributary to Clifford Lake that has wild brook trout. This stream crossing currently limits passage for trout and other aquatic organisms. The current crossing is also a significant sediment source due to improper construction and overtopping. The crossing was replaced with a 1.2 bankfull open bottom arch culvert (15ft wide) designed to allow passage at all flows.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
File chemical/x-pdb Tipton Creek Culvert Replacement, NC_FY10 Project
In the summer of 2011 the culvert at the Davis Creek Road (FSR 420) crossing of Tipton Creek was removed and replaced with a concrete arch, stream simulation crossing for the purpose of passing aquatic organisms, where the existing culvert was known to be a barrier to aquatic passage due to velocity and outlet drop. The crossing was sized using the 100-year flow calculation derived from the USGS Regression Equation for the mountains of North Carolina. Additionally, the width of the crossing was designed to accommodate a bankfull flow channel dimension plus a small area of floodplain. The channel was reconstructed through the crossing using the dimension, pattern, and profile of the reference reach upstream. The new channel was constructed using imported boulders and onsite alluvial materials. Grass seed was sown, and trees and shrubs were planted, both potted and live-stakes. Over the last year since construction, the site has experienced several small flood events. The site remains stable, passable to all aquatic species, and looks more and more natural every year as planted and natural vegetation establishes.
Located in Projects / Project Completion Reports
Celebrating 1,000 Culverts
THE U.S. FOREST SERVICE AND ITS MANY PARTNERS ARE BUILDING BETTER CULVERTS TO OPEN WATERWAYS FOR FISH TO GROW, REPRODUCE AND SURVIVE, TO IMPROVE THE RESILIENCY OF ROADS TO FLOODING, AND TO PROTECT TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMMUNITIES
Located in Announcements / Announcements Inbox
Person Troff document Calvert, Patrick
Located in Members
Project Pascal source code 2014 Restoring Habitat Connectivity, Machias & Saint Croix River tributary streams ME: EBTJV&NFHAP
Downeast Lakes Land Trust (DLLT) will continue its work with partners to restore brook trout habitat on priority streams in the headwaters of the Machias River and the west branch of the Saint Croix River by removing passage barriers.
Located in Projects / 2014 Projects
Culvert Replacement and Instream Habitat Restoration on Indian Stream, New Hampshire
In 2006, an initial watershed based assessment of coldwater habitat conditions was completed by Trout Unlimited in the Upper Connecticut in New Hampshire and Vermont. In 2008, Trout Unlimited designated the Upper Connecticut as one if its Home Rivers Initiatives, the only one in New England. Trout Unlimited's assessment identified fish habitat problems through the watershed, including lack of riparian habitat, poor instream habitat diversity and complexity, and inadequate stream crossings. This project will initiate the first phase of a long term culvert removal and instream habitat program by replacing four high priority culverts and implementing instream woody habitat restorations in Indian Stream, starting on the East Branch. The culverts to be replaced are on four important brook trout nursery streams: Dry Creek, Johns Brook, Hidden Brook, and Alder Brook. The project will restore 3 miles of habitat on east branch, the largest tributary to Indian Stream.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects
Hamant Brook Culvert Replacement, Old Sturbridge Village, Massachusetts
The two leading causes of brook trout habitat degradation in Massachusetts have been identified through the EBTJV as fragmentation by dams and roads. The subwatershed containing Hamant Brook was identified as high impact from dam fragmentation and medium impact from road fragmentation. This project will remove three dams and one impassable culvert, allowing access from mainstem habitat to a coldwater tributary and converting 70% of the project area from impounded to free-flowing. Once complete, the project will open nearly 8 miles of habitat and provide access to more diverse free flowing and coldwater habitats for brook trout and riverine fish species.
Located in Projects / 2010 Projects